For Tuesday, 12/12 (SOC 1102)

December 11, 2017

Prep

In Class

  • Recap: Life of a Building
  • Barry Wellman, ‘The Community Question: The Intimate Networks of East Yorkers’ (1979)
  • Course Evaluations

For Final Exam Period (12/19)

  • Remaining Pecha Kuchas
  • The final exam will be due at the end of the day (11:59pm)
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For Saturday, 12/16 (SOC 1103)

December 9, 2017

Here again is the scenario I asked you to consider at the end of class today:

My husband and I have been together for 10 years and married for two. Early in our relationship, he used cocaine casually, and I told him I didn’t want him to use it. It was a nonnegotiable. He accepted that and we were O.K., but recently that’s changed. I’ve caught him using it three times in the past six months. Each time, he’s lied to me about it.

He thinks I’m narrow-minded. He says I’ve turned into a cop. Most of his friends do cocaine frequently, and they don’t think there’s anything wrong with that. To him, I’m a party pooper. I think it’s reasonable to ask him to stop doing something that hurts our marriage and potentially his health. I love clubbing with him! I can go to clubs all night and not do drugs — and so can he, or at least he could in the past.

I’m 35 and at a crossroads. I know he’s not an addict, but I’m still scared and I’m drained by our fights. I love him deeply, but I don’t trust him, and I’m not sure I can start a family with someone I don’t trust. Am I being unreasonable? Is there hope for us?

Snowblue

What should Snowblue do? (Write some of your thoughts down before looking at what the experts say. Looking forward to hearing what you think!)

Prep

  • Benokraitis (2015), from Ch. 15 (‘Separation, Divorce, Remarriage, and Stepfamilies’)

In Class

  • MISSING ASSIGNMENTS
  • Love, Lies, & Cocaine: You Make the Call
  • BREAK
  • Marriage, Remarriage, & Divorce
  • Course Evaluations

Final Exam Due Sunday, 17 December

For Thursday, 12/7 (SOC 1102)

December 5, 2017

Prep

Agenda

  • Darwin will present on Lambert

Screen Shot 2017-12-06 at 3.58.46 PM

  • Brief Review: Final Exam (Research Brief #3)
  • Student Evaluations

For Next Time

  • If I’m not mistaken, we don’t meet again until the exam day; that would be the last chance for everyone to do a pecha kucha!

For Monday, 12/11 (SOC 3250)

December 5, 2017

Oy, what terrible timing for a fire alarm! Poor Tee had just begun her presentation. We’ll try again at the start of the next class, then move on to workshopping each other’s papers. I’ll pair each of you with a partner randomly; you’ll exchange drafts during the week, read each other’s papers and evaluate them using this grading rubric, and use those rubrics to structure your in-person feedback on Monday.

Prep

  • Booth et al., The Craft of Research, Ch. 6 (‘Engaging Sources’; see esp. the discussion of ‘creative agreement’ and ‘creative disagreement’ in Section 6.3!)

Agenda

  • MISSING ASSIGNMENTS
  • Tee will present on Meyer
  • On Bad Writing About Sources, With Examples from Genius
  • Writing Workshop

For Next Time

  • Remaining Presentations

For Saturday, 12/9 (SOC 1103)

December 2, 2017

Prep

  • Benokraitis (2015), from Ch. 10 (‘Marriage and Communication in Intimate Relationships’)

If you have a moment, take a look at this essay on reading that I mentioned in class. Reading broadens your knowledge of the world, and broad knowledge of the world helps you read with more understanding. It’s a virtuous circle.

In Class

  • Missing Assignments
  • BREAK
  • Course Evaluations

For Next Class

  • Benokraitis (2015), Ch. 15 (‘Separation, Divorce, Remarriage, and Stepfamilies’)

For Tuesday, 12/5 (SOC 1102)

November 30, 2017

Prep

In Class

Here’s the fascinating essay I mentioned in class that argues for the decommodification of housing. Check it out if you’ve got time.

For Next Time

For Saturday, 12/2 (SOC 1103)

November 29, 2017

Prep

In Class

  • Review of the HW
  • BREAK
  • Discussion: Scenes from
    • Pride and Prejudice (Robert Z. Leonard, 1940)
    • Pride and Prejudice (Simon Langton, 1995)
    • Pride and Prejudice (Joe Wright, 2005)
  • On Bad Writing, Using Examples from genius.com

For Next Time

  • Benokraitis (2015), from Ch. 10 (‘Marriage and Communication in Intimate Relationships’)

36 Questions (SOC 1103)

November 29, 2017

 

Mandy Len Catron wrote a wildly popular essay about her experience with a series of questions designed by a team of psychologists to foster intimacy between strangers; here, producers at the New York Times show what happens when longtime couples pose these same questions to each other. The format may remind you of some of the interviews that Aziz Ansari conducts in nursing homes, or (if you’re a film buff) of the vignettes in the ur-Rom-Com classic When Harry Met Sally.  Either way, it will probably jerk some ‘awwww’s out of you.

For Thursday, 11/30 (SOC 1102)

November 28, 2017

Prep

In Class

  • Nyasia presents on Glass (1963)
  • Shania presents on Kohn

For Next Time

  • TBA

Research Brief #2: Gentrification: For or Against? (SOC 1102)

November 28, 2017

We could call ‘gentrification’ another word for ‘progress’

While many people see ‘gentrification’ as a dirty word, others argue that it is to be welcomed, either wholly or in part — one person’s ‘gentrification’ is another person’s ‘revitalization’ (or ‘progress’), we might say. Who’s right, and why? What evidence do we have for the positive and negative effects of gentrification? What processes do you see occurring in your own neighbourhood — and what are the boundaries of this neighbourhood, exactly? Here is a website that allows you to draw the boundaries of your ‘hood, and to compare your cognitive map with those of your neighbours. (Tell me what you discover here.)

You are welcome to use whatever other sources you find helpful in drawing your conclusions — peer-reviewed journal articles from the scholarly literature; interviews; historical documents; field research; newspaper reports; op-ed columns; long-form essays from popular periodicals; maps; geographical software; databases; blogs; Wikipedia and other reference works; and so on (and it would be hard to believe that you wouldn’t find any number of our assigned readings also useful in this regard). However: this is a research assignment, and you will be judged on the quality of your research. As far as I’m concerned, you haven’t really done your homework unless you (1) conduct your own research, or — more reasonably — (2) carefully review the research of other scholars. Again, if this is not already clear, such work is to be found in peer-reviewed scholarly journal articles.

As far as quantity, there is no minimum number of sources required. But the quality of a scholarly argument depends both upon the thoroughness of the research (how many sources you’ve consulted, roughly speaking) and in the way those sources are employed.

Instructions

  • Due Date: Sunday, 3 December, by 11:59 pm
  • Maximum word count for body of text = 1,000 words
  • Print the word count at the top of your paper
  • Double-spaced, 12-pt. font
  • ASA-style Bibliography and in-text citations