For Tuesday, 9/26 (SOC 1102)

September 20, 2017

I forgot to circulate a copy of the syllabus for people to provisionally sign up for the Pecha Kuchas, but there’s nothing stopping you from contacting me and telling me which reading you plan to present on! Figure it out now before it’s too late!

Before Class

[1] I am assigning an excerpted version, but you can go here for the original article in its entirety.

During

  • Introduction: The Chicago School

 

 

After

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For Monday, 9/25 (SOC 3250)

September 19, 2017

Before Class

Both of the articles for this week can be found in either the 2nd or 3rd editions of the Goodwin & Jasper reader. Here, btw, is a link to the essay on ‘virtue signaling’ I mentioned in class.

  • Douglas McAdam, ‘Recruits to Civil Rights Activism’
  • Charles Kurzman, ‘Who Are the Radical Islamists?’

For Saturday, 9/23 (SOC 1103)

September 19, 2017

Before Class

Focus on the two textbook chapters; the other readings are short and can be skimmed.

 

For Tuesday, 9/19 (SOC 1102)

September 18, 2017

Before

During

  • TBA

After

  • Louis Wirth, ‘Urbanism as a Way of Life’ (1938; this is in your reader)

 

For Thursday, 9/14 (SOC 1102)

September 12, 2017

Before

  • Friedrich Engels, ‘The Great Towns’ (Bridge & Watson 2010). You can also find similar excerpts (the original work is a 1945 book entitled Die Lage der arbeitenden Klasse in England, or The Conditions of the Working Classes in England) online; here’s one version,  slightly longer than the one you’ll find in the book.

During

  • Discussion: The First City and the City from Hell

After

  • Ferdinand Toennies, from Gemeinschaft and Gesellschaft*

 

REFERENCES

Bridge, Gary, and Sophie Watson, eds. 2010. The Blackwell City Reader, 2nd Ed. Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell.

For Monday, 9/18 (SOC 3250)

September 11, 2017

Last week I mentioned that I would post a template you can use for your in-class presentations; you can find it here, under ‘Presenting on an Assigned Reading’.

Before

  • Richard Hofstadter, ‘The Paranoid Style in American Politics’, Harper’s (1964)
  • Ruth Milkman, Stephanie Luce, and Penny Lewis, ‘Occupy Wall Street’ (Goodwin & Jasper 2015)
  • Manuel Castells, ‘The Egyptian Revolution’ (Goodwin & Jasper 2015)

Hofstadter offers a famous explanation of the origins of modern conservatism, one that is still frequently invoked today. But is it really true? And can it explain Trump’s rise?

During

  • TBA

After

  • TBA

 

 

For Tuesday, 9/12 (SOC 1102)

September 11, 2017

As hard as it is to believe, we still haven’t really delved into the basic take-aways from the Pfeiffer essay. So we’ll do that tomorrow. You should browse that essay again, and also think about which reading you’d like to do your Pecha Kucha on.

For Monday, 9/11 (SOC 3250)

September 6, 2017

Well, we had a bit of a long break there – kinda feels like the semester started and then went away! Monday we begin in earnest, but I’ll try to keep the reading light. Let’s just aim to discuss the readings I’d hoped you might be able to get to before our first meeting.

Before

During

  • Discussion: Is There Any Point to Protest?
  • On Reading
  • On Writing
  • On Research

After

  • TBA

 

REFERENCES

Goodwin, Jeff, James M. Jasper, eds. 2015. The Social Movements Reader: Cases and Concepts, 3rd Edition. Wiley Blackwell.

For Thursday, 9/7 (SOC 1102)

September 6, 2017

Finally … we’ll discuss Pfeiffer. By the way, here’s a link to that Richard Florida essay I mentioned in class, the one that claims our urban renaissance is over.

Before

During

  • Reading to Understand the Structure of an Author’s Argument
    • (An example of an argument in this sense, as I mentioned before, would be the case that Richard Florida presents to support his claim that America’s urban revival is ‘over’).
  • Q&A: Pfeiffer on the Prehistory of Cities

After

  • Start thinking about the reading you would like to choose for your Pecha Kucha (oral presentation). Time’s a-wasting!

Pecha Kucha Oral Presentation Guidelines (SOC 1102)

September 5, 2017
  • 20 slides, auto-advanced every 20 seconds.
  • Think about images, handouts or props you might use; don’t be that presenter just standing in front of the class, reading from your notes.
  • Pose a minimum of two focused and thoughtful questions for discussion.
  • Email me a copy of your presentation (slides, notes, etc.) the day before you present (due by midnight at the latest); penalty for missing the deadline is 50 points.
  • Print out a copy of the first page of the Scoring Guide for Pecha Kuchas and submit this to me before you begin.
  • Just to be clear, it is not enough to summarize the assigned text and then pose two pro forma questions; you must summarize the most important points from the text, then attempt to consider its significance in relation to the literature under study here (namely, the urban-sociological literature). Some examples: if we’ve read other texts by this author (or you have made it your business to read them on your own), how does her thinking evolve (or not)? How do they relate to earlier texts, ideas, and authors in the literature (or related literatures)? How do they relate to their contemporaries? How do they relate to texts, ideas, and authors that came after? What is the significance of the text, given these considerations? How relevant, useful, or influential is it, given current concerns and projects in the literature? What was original about it? Etc.[1]
  • You cannot earn a grade higher than an 80 (B-) if you ignore the above tasks.

 

Further Reading/Notes Toward a Personal Canon

Murray, George J.A. 2015. ‘Presentations, Presentations, Presentations’Staring into the Middle Distance, 14 December. You can find various bits of advice on presenting here, as well as a template for (non-PK) in-class presentations.

Reynolds, Garr. 2005. ‘Gates, Jobs, & the Zen Aesthetic’Presentation Zen. Retrieved 5 September 2017 (http://presentationzen.blogs.com/presentationzen/2005/11/the_zen_estheti.html).

 

[1] Cf. the discussion of ‘theory’ as the study of the classics in Gabriel Abend, ‘The Meaning of “Theory”’, Sociological Theory 26:2 (June 2008), p. 179.