For Monday, 11/27 (SOC 3250)

November 21, 2017

With rough drafts of the final paper due soon, here’s my recollection of the questions  people are working on:

  • Isatou: Was the civil rights movement a success in the eyes of its leaders? This is a very broad question, and a lot depends on whom you choose to identify as the leaders; but it’s a start. Recently, of course, some have argued that ‘leaderless’ movements are more effective than the kind of ‘top-down’ organisational structure associated with the civil rights movement. For what it’s worth, however, it’s worth noting that government fears of the emergence of a revolutionary ‘black messiah’ gave rise to the dark arts practised by the FBI during the COINTELPRO era we read about two weeks ago; recently, FBI memos  about the putative rise of ‘Black Identity Extremists’ have evoked echoes of this era for some.
  • Janet: ?
  • Jorge is interested in the movement to allow LGBT soldiers to sere openly in the military. If memory serves, there’s no research question yet. Better hurry! (Chapters 1-4 of The Craft of Research would be well worth studying at this point.)
  • Lizbeth: ? See my comments on Jorge’s project.
  • Nisei has a topic (the movement to legalise abortion), but no research question yet. See my comments on Jorge’s project.
  • Tee: ? See my comments on Jorge’s project.
  • Walquidia: ? See my comments on Jorge’s project.
  • Wesley: In what ways was Occupy Wall Street a success? Is such a movement sustainable?

Prep

  • Rough draft of final paper due Wednesday, 11/30
  • William Gamson, ‘Defining Movement “Success”‘ (Goodwin & Jasper 2015) [Nisei]
  • Sharon Erickson Nepstad, ‘Why Nonviolence Sometimes Fails: China in 1989’ (Goodwin & Jasper 2015)

In Class

  • Nisei will present on Gamson (2015)
  • BREAK
  • Someone really needs to sign up for Nepstad (2015) — there aren’t very many opportunities left to present!

For Next Time

  • David S. Meyer, ‘How Social Movements Matter’, Contexts 2 (2013): 30-35 (also in Goodwin & Jasper 2015) [Tee]
  • Jack Goldstone, ‘Understanding Revolutions: The Arab Uprisings’ (Goodwin & Jasper 2015)
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Social Movements Research Paper Assignment (SOC 3250)

November 21, 2017

In this assignment you need to pose a question that is relevant in some way to central themes in the course, then survey a portion of the social movements research literature in articulating a substantive, thoughtful answer to this question. Here are some classic, recurring questions, as formulated in Goodwin & Jasper (2015):

  1. When and why do social movements occur?
  2. Who joins or supports SMs?
  3. Who remains in movements, who drops out, and why?
  4. How are movements organised?
  5. What do movements do?
  6. How do they interact with other players (e.g., government agencies, local police forces, corporations, the media)? (Which movements attract repressive efforts by the state, for example? Which ones attract media attention?)
  7. Why do movements decline? (Why do some movements succeed and others fail?)
  8. What changes do movements bring about? (What constitutes success? What constitutes failure? )

If you were interested in the rise of the kind of ‘populism’ we associate with the election of Donald Trump, for example, you might start by looking at some recent social movements research on populist movements. You might seek to explain its rise in terms of one of the competing theories of when and why social movements occur (see Question 1 above). Or you might look at a particular group in terms of its organisational structure (see Question 4): do right-wing SMOs (social movement organisations) typically organise themselves differently than do left-wing SMOs? (Consider, for example, various SMOs associated with the Occupy Wall Street or Black Lives Matter movements.) Or you might wonder about the demographics of the people who join or support the ‘alt-right’ movement (see Question 2): are they mostly people filled with ‘status anxiety’ by an increasingly diverse society, as many liberal observers suggest?

INSTRUCTIONS

  • Word count: the body of the paper should not be longer than 3,000 words.
  • Print the word count at the top of your first page.
  • Do not write your name anywhere on your paper; you will submit a link to your Google Doc via Blackboard, which will allow me to grade you anonymously but still assign the proper grade to each author.
  • You must use at least five sources from peer-reviewed journals. By now you should understand that this is just a bare minimum — the superior student will do much more research than that (chapters five and six of The Craft of Research should be especially helpful here).
  • Your paper must include a list of references at the end, and all in-text citations and reference-list citations (note the example below) should be done in ASA style.

 

REFERENCES

Goodwin, Jeff, and James Jasper, eds. 2015. The Social Movements Reader: Cases and Concepts, 3rd Ed. New York: Wiley Blackwell.

For Thursday, 11/28 (SOC 1102)

November 16, 2017

Wow, I just realised that we won’t be meeting again for almost two weeks. In light of the end that’s fast approaching, here’s a list of scheduled PKs. If you’re not on this list, you’d better figure something out but quick!*

  • Film: The Social Life of Small Urban Places (William H. Whyte, 1988) [Kemani Laing]
  • Ruth Glass, ‘Introduction: Aspects of Change’, in London: Aspects of Change, ed. Centre for Urban Studies (London, 1964: MacKibbon and Kee), pp. xiii-xlii [Nyasia Walters]
  • Lance Freeman, ‘Displacement or Succession? Residential Mobility in Gentrifying Neighborhoods’, Urban Affairs Review 40(4):463-491 [Elsabeth Maximin, Vanessa Priano — we’re gonna have to flip a coin here]
  • Mary Pattillo, ‘The Black Bourgeoisie Meets the Truly Disadvantaged’, Black on the Block: The Politics of Race and Class (Chicago: University of Chicago, 2004) [Alica Cradle, Daniel Medina — arm-wrestle?]
  • Margaret Kohn, ‘What Is Wrong with Gentrification?’, Urban Research & Practice 6(3):297-310 [Shania Lewis]
  • Kevin Loughran, ‘Parks for Profit: The High Line, Growth Machines, and the Uneven Development of Urban Public Spaces’, City & Community 13, no. 1 (2014), pp. 49-68 [Ann Jean]
  • Clifford Shearing and Phillip Stenning, ‘From the Panopticon to Disney World’, (Massey 2006) [Ayodele Ajanoku]

*Chynna, Darwin, Dixon, Christopher Mendoza, Oludara, Jennifer, and Alexander: you either signed up for readings that have already passed,  or it wasn’t clear exactly which ones you were volunteering for. So please contact me via gmail (it’s on the syllabus) and we’ll figure something out.

Prep

In-Class Agenda

  • PK: Nyasia on Glass (1964)

For Next Time

For Monday, 11/20 (SOC 3250)

November 14, 2017

Which is most important? Should a movement focus on cultural influence, disrupting the status quo, or getting organised? Which will attract the most media coverage (recall the findings we discussed in Week 11)? And which one has, say, the alt-right been most effective at? Here’s that Op-Ed I mentioned in class on how protest works.

Prep

In-Class Agenda

  • Nisei will present on Epstein (2015)
  • BREAK
  • Jorge will present on Roxborough (2015)
  • Review: Final Paper Requirements

For Next Time

  • Due: Rough Draft of Final Paper
  • William Gamson, ‘Defining Movement “Success”’ (Goodwin & Jasper 2015) [Presenter: Nisei]
  • David S. Meyer, ‘How Social Movements Matter’, Contexts 2(2013): 30-35 (also in Goodwin & Jasper 2015) [Presenter: Tee]

For Thursday, 11/16 (SOC 1102)

November 14, 2017

Prep

In-Class Agenda

  • TBA

For Next Time

  • TBA

For Saturday, 11/18 (SOC 1103)

November 11, 2017

After thinking a bit more about how to deal with our upcoming two-week break after next Saturday, I’ve moved up some of our textbook reading. So for next time, we’ll only discuss Volume I of Pride and Prejudice, and save the bulk of it for the week after Thanksgiving. See you next Saturday!

Fun Facts

There were 77 million dogs in America in 2010, up from 53 million in 1996. “We’ve seen a linear explosion in pet populations in Western countries over the past 40 years,” one researcher says. “People are living more isolated lives, are having fewer children, their marriages aren’t lasting. All these things sort of break down a social network and happen to exactly coincide with the growth in pet populations. What’s happening is simply that we’re allowing animals to fill the gap in our lives.”

Hmm. In the weeks after the break, maybe we should expand our purview to accommodate the ‘doggyfication’ of family life — after all, in our first few weeks together we all agreed that the definition of what constitutes family is changing.

Prep

  • Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (1813), Vol. I
  • Benokraitis (2015), Ch. 9 (‘Singlehood, Cohabitation, Civil Unions, and Other Options’); focus on Sections 9.1 (‘The Single Option’), 9.4 (‘Why More People Are Single’), and 9.6 (‘Cohabitation’), and 9.7 (‘Gay and Lesbian Couples’)

Agenda 

  • Benokraitis (2015), Ch. 9: Singlehood & Cohabitation
  • BREAK
  • Pride & Prejudice: Opening Lines, Opening Scenes. We’ll discuss a few key passages from Vol. I, and supplement them with scenes from various film versions of Austen’s great story, among them:
    • Pride and Prejudice (Robert Z. Leonard, 1940)
    • Pride and Prejudice (Simon Langton, 1995)
    • Pride and Prejudice (Joe Wright, 2005)

For Next Time

For Tuesday, 11/14 (SOC 1102)

November 9, 2017

Chicago footwork legend Traxman doin’ his thing.

Here are some links to some things I mentioned in class — specifically, this podcast on the the origins of Detroit techno and Chicago house, and this journalistic portrait of Berlin nightlife and the techno around which it revolves.

Prep

  • William H. Whyte, ‘The Design of Spaces’
    • This is very readable, not especially long, and practically begs for a good slideshow; you’d be smart to fulfill your PK obligation with this one…
    • Note: Whyte also made a film based on his research; it’s quite fun:

In-Class Agenda

  • Missing Research Briefs
  • PK: Elijah on Richard Florida
  • William H. Whyte and Urban Design

For Thursday, 11/16

Midterm (SOC 1103)

November 8, 2017

Scholars of the family have generally interpreted recent changes in family life in one of three ways:

  1. The family is declining.
  2. The family has never been stronger.
  3. The family is changing, but neither better nor worse. Just different.

Which perspective best describes the way we live now, based on what we’ve read? And how does your own experience of family life shed light on this question? Please be specific—use examples and relate them to the thinkers discussed in the syllabus! You must use a minimum of five of the texts or chapters from the syllabus in constructing your answer—but I encourage you in addition to employ other sources, whether journalistic, photojournalistic, literary, documentary, cartographic, ethnographic, demographic, etc.

  • You will be submitting this exam as a Google Doc.
  • (Do not include your name; paste a link to your Google Doc in the appropriate place on Blackboard. I will grade you anonymously; Blackboard will enable me to identify who’s getting what grade after the fact.)
  • Maximum word count for the body of the text (the essay itself, not including supporting documents such as a cover page, footnotes/endnotes, reference list, appendices, etc.) is 1,000 words. Print the word count at the top of the first page.
  • Essays should be double-spaced, 12-pt. font.
  • Make sure you include a reference list. In-text and reference-list citations should be done according to ASA style.

For Thursday, 11/9 (SOC 1102)

November 7, 2017

Prepping for Thursday

  • Review Richard Florida, ‘Cities and the Creative Class’, City & Community 2:1 (March 2003) [Elijah]
  • Read Ingo Bader and Albert Scharenberg, ‘‘The Sound of Berlin: Subculture and the Global Music Industry’, International Journal of Urban and Regional
    Research
    34, No. 1 (March 2010), pp. 76-91 [Sabhir]. Is Florida’s creative city concept really an adequate basis for an economically sustainable urban policy? The example of Berlin suggests otherwise. This is especially interesting because Tony Wilson (in the interview excerpt from Joy Division [Grant Gee, 2007]) provides such vivid testimony in support of Florida’s thesis, and the makers of 24 Hour Party People seem to view the film as merely a dramatization of the process Florida claims to have discovered.

In-Class Agenda

For Tuesday, 11/12

  • William H. Whyte, ‘The Design of Spaces’

For Monday, 11/13 (SOC 3250)

November 6, 2017

This is Week 12, so time is running out on your chances to do the two required presentations; let me know ASAP if you’d like to present on either of the two readings for this week.

Prep

Agenda

  • Checking In: How’s the Writing Going?
  • Slight Return: How Protest Works
  • Discussion: How Do You Stop a Movement?

For Next Time

  • Barbara Epstein, ‘The Decline of the Women’s Movement’ (Goodwin & Jasper 2015)
    • Presenter: Nisei
  • Ian Roxborough, ‘Counterinsurgency’ (Goodwin & Jasper 2015)