Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

For Saturday, 10/28 (SOC 1103)Se

October 21, 2017

Prep

  • Review Benokraitis (2015), Ch. 6 (‘Love and Loving Relationships’), especially 6.4 (‘The Biochemistry of Love’), 6.7 (‘Jealousy: Trying to Control Love’), 6.8 (‘Love in Long-Term Relationships’), and 6.9 (‘Love Across Cultures’)
  • Benokraitis (2015), Ch. 7 (‘Sexuality and Sexual Expression Throughout Life’), especially 7.7 (‘Sexual Infidelity’)
  • Ansari (2015), Ch. 3 (‘Online Dating’)

Agenda

  • TBA

Homework

  • TBA
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For Tuesday, 10/24 (SOC 1102)

October 19, 2017

Prep

  • You can look through the Rothstein essay. Or work on your research brief. Or read ahead by taking a look at the Nevarez essay. Or all three.

Agenda

Homework

  • Leonard Nevarez, ‘How Joy Division Came to Sound Like Manchester: Myth and Ways of Listening in the Neoliberal City’, Journal of Popular Music Studies Vol. 25, No. 1 (March 2013), pp. 56-76. We won’t be discussing this until Thursday at the earliest, since we’ll be watching a film on Tuesday and some of Thursday.
    • PK: Raphael

Annotated Bibliography Assignment

October 18, 2017

Identify at least ten scholarly publications having to do with your proposal topic. ‘Scholarly’ in this context means that the item in question is published in a peer-reviewed journal or by a university press. That means that neither newspaper/magazine articles do not count, nor do popular books or book reviews in general. However, all of these excluded sources may help you to identify scholars on your topic whose work you can then seek out (in the case of book reviews, you may include the book reviewed rather than the review itself). These sources should all have a clearly shared focus. For each article, read the abstract and write an even briefer 3-6 sentences about what the article is about. 

Example:

Carswell, Andrew and Douglas Bachtell. 2009. “Mortgage Fraud: A Risk Factor Analysis of Affected Communities.” Crime, Law and Social Change 52: 347-364.

Mortgage fraud is a type of white collar crime that is growing in importance. The data analysis indicates that it occurs more often in neighborhoods with low socioeconomic status. However, there are important differences between regions and the neighborhood has an effect. Recommendations for future research are given. 

Create a Google Doc of this bibliography (include a one-paragraph description of your topic at the top) and paste a shareable link to it in the appropriate answer box on Blackboard (I’ll send you a link in the announcement for next week’s agenda).

Pro Tips

Electronic Resources on the campus library website is the easiest place to begin a search. Some of the links on this page will only work while you are on a campus computer; for others, you can sign in from elsewhere using your library ID number (on the front of your ID card). From home, try Social Science Plus Text, Ebsco Academic Premiere (for these two limit your search to peer reviewed articles), and JStor (which has many full text articles from a smaller, but excellent, list of journals many of which are not included in other data bases).

Sociological Abstracts includes a wide range of materials (use publication type=PT if you want to eliminate conference papers and dissertations), but you will need to find the source for the actual texts of articles. Don’t forget that you can access many resources via the CUNY portal, the same way you get to Blackboard. 

You should start looking at articles and books in the next week in order to make good progress on your final project. It may turn out that some of the sources you identify here will not actually serve your purposes. Therefore, it probably will pay off if you read all of the abstracts now and obtain copies of the articles that seem most relevant.

Finding Sources

This is very important because the materials you find here will be the core of your literature review for the research proposal. Ebsco, ProQuest and JStor and some of the other data bases have many full text articles. For other articles, it is possible you will have to go to the periodical room of the library.

Sometimes you can find articles by searching for an author’s home page on the internet. If you cannot find a journal at Lehman on on the electronic databases, go to CUNYPlus and search for the journal title. This will tell you what other CUNY campuses have the journal. You will have to go to the campus to obtain the journal. The New York Public Library also has many scholarly books and journals.

Further Reading

I have a brief post on doing literature reviews here.

 

*This assignment is based on one created by Professor Elin Waring (Lehman College).

For Thursday, 10/19 (SOC 1102)

October 18, 2017

Pruitt-Igoe-collapses.jpg.948

Prep

  • Charles Jencks, ‘The Death of Modern Architecture’, in Jencks, The Language of Post-Modern Architecture (New York: Rizzoli, 1977). This is a bit tangential to our  through-line discussion of suburbanization and sprawl, but connects a few interesting dots vis-à-vis inner-city ghettoization, racial segregation in St. Louis, Jane Jacobs, public housing, social engineering, and our old friend, Spatial Determinism. This excerpt is quite brief — just two pages — but there will likely be a number of concepts, cultural references, and vocabulary that are unfamiliar to you. Make a list of at least a few of these keywords/obscurities and try to gloss them; I’ll be calling on you at random.

Agenda

  • Booth et al., ‘Engaging Sources’ , Ch. 6 of The Craft of Research (PK: Christopher Mendoza). In general, you cannot present on a reading that we’ve already discussed; but we didn’t really dig into this one on the day we were supposed to; we only talked about Chapter 5 (‘From Problems to Sources’).
  • Q&A: Keywords in Jencks, ‘The Death of Modern Architecture’
  • Film: The Pruitt-Igoe Myth (Brad Freidrichs, 2011)

Homework

For Monday, 10/23 (SOC 3250)

October 16, 2017

I will send word shortly about where we’ll meet next week. Does anyone have a particular preference for the Sociology Lounge vs. the Media Room we’ve used the last two weeks? I think both are preferable to the original classroom, although it’d be nice to have some windows as well.

A number of people expressed frustration during today’s class, and I’m sorry if it seemed as if we went on a number of tangents; there are a number of readings I’d like to assign you all, but I don’t want to overburden you with reading (I’d rather you read closely and carefully, even if it means reading less). Because they’re important parts of the story we’ve been covering, however, I often feel compelled to bring up those subplots and background reading in class. Since we didn’t really have much time to discuss O’Connor’s ‘Privatized City’ in class, I’ll post a brief discussion of her article in the next few days we’ll briefly return to that text in the next class.

A Reminder About Class Etiquette: You’re expected to be in class on time. If you think there’s any reason you might be late, you should email me as a common courtesy. If you find yourself dozing off in class, ask if you can step out and grab a coffee, tea, Red Bull, etc. And if you need to use your phone for anything during class, please check with me before class.

Prep: What Do Movements Do?

Agenda

  • Mini-Lecture: Richard Hofstadter, the ‘Paranoid Style’ of the New Right, and Infowars
  • Q&A: Alice O’Connor on the Manhattan Institute
  • Q&A: Taylor et al. on Tactical Repertoires and Same-Sex Weddings

HW

  • TBA

Further Reading/Notes Toward a Personal Canon

Grynbaum, Michael. 2017. ‘Las Vegas Massacre Gives InfoWars More Conspiracy Fodder’New York Times, 9 October.

For Saturday, 10/21 (SOC 1103)

October 14, 2017

Before

  • Benokraitis (2015), Ch. 6 (‘Love and Loving Relationships’), primarily 6.4 (‘The Biochemistry of Love’), 6.7 (‘Jealousy: Trying to Control Love’), 6.8 (‘Love in Long-Term Relationships’), and 6.9 (‘Love Across Cultures’)
  • Ansari (2015), Chs. 1 (‘Searching for Your Soul Mate’), 5 (‘International Investigations of Love’), and 6 (‘Old Issues, New Forms: Sexting, Cheating, Snooping, and Breaking Up’)

Agenda

  • TBA

Homework

  • TBA

For Tuesday, 10/17 (SOC 1102)

October 12, 2017

Before

We didn’t get very far into the details of the Rothstein essay, so please review that reading again and we’ll go over it in more detail (some of you expressed surprise at the details of an anecdote about ‘blockbusting’ that I recounted; it appears near the end of the text, so it seems as though some of you could use some extra time to finish reading it the whole way through).

During

  • More on the Craft of Research: How would you gain a critical perspective on Rothstein’s argument? How might you find studies that question his findings or conclusions?
  • The Craft of Writing

After

  • TBA

Further Reading/Notes Toward a Personal Canon

Rothstein, Richard. 2017. The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America. Liveright. In ‘The Making of Ferguson’, Rothstein argued that what happened in St. Louis is symptomatic of what happened in cities across the country; here he seeks to tell that larger story. Here’s video of a conversation between Rothstein and the writer Ta-Nehisi Coates about the book.

For Thursday, 10/12 (SOC 1102)

October 10, 2017

Before

During

  • Soundtrack: Our Thematically Relevant Song of the Day contains some graphic language. So I apologise for that ahead of time.
  • Review: Research Brief #1
  • Primary, Secondary, & Tertiary Sources
  • Ferguson on Film: For Ahkeem (Jeremy S. Levine & Landon Van Soest, 2017). A good friend of mine helped produce the highly timely film below. It’s making its New York debut this weekend; check it out!

For Ahkeem Trailer from Weissman Studio on Vimeo.

  • Discussion: The Making of Ferguson
  • Conclusio

After

Further Reading/Notes Towards a Personal Canon

Club Tracts. An underground electronic dance music theory archive.

Democracy at the Disco.

Research Brief #1 (SOC 1102)

October 10, 2017

Can sprawl be defended? Some commentators view it as the embodiment of personal freedom and mobility (Barnes 2000; Gordon and Richardson 2000; Tierney 2004); others argue that it’s simply what the majority of people want (Gladwell 2000; Gordon and Richardson, ibid.). Meanwhile, critics point to what they see as the aesthetic, environmental, and social costs of such development (Duany and Plater-Zyberk 2001; Lassiter 2004; numerous proponents of the New Urbanism and ‘Smart Growth’).

You must use a minimum of five scholarly journal articles in constructing your answer, but I highly recommend that you employ a host of other resources as well – newspaper articles, Op-Eds, specialized weeklies, journals, and magazines (e.g., the rather conservative City Journal, BLDGBLG, design glossies like Dwell). Or consider polling data: Gladwell claims that suburbia is where most people want to be, but what do people actually say in public opinion surveys?

Requirements

  • Due Date: Tuesday, 24 October 2017
  • Dead Date: 11:59pm, Sunday, 29 October 2017
  • Maximum word count for body of text = 1,000 words
  • Print the word count on the front page of your submission
  • ASA-style Bibliography
  • This paper must be submitted as a Google Doc via Blackboard.
  • Papers that do not follow these instructions will be returned ungraded.

Further Reading

Annual Review of Sociology.

City & Community.

Journal of Urban Affairs.

Journal of Urban & Regional Research.

References
Barnes, Fred. 2000. ‘The Beauty of Suburban Sprawl’. The Weekly Standard.

Duany, Andres, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, and Jeff Speck. 2001. Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Death of the American Dream.

Gladwell, Malcolm. 2000. ‘Designs for Working’. The New Yorker, 11 December, pp. 60-70.

Gordon, Peter, and Harry W. Richardson. 2000. ‘Defending Suburban Sprawl’. The Public Interest, 139:65-71.

Lassiter, Matthew. 2004. ‘The Suburban Origins of “Color-Blind” Conservatism: Middle-Class Consciousness in the Charlotte Busing Crisis’. Journal of Urban History 30(4):549-82.

Tierney, John. 2004. ‘The Autonomist Manifesto (Or, How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Road)’. New York Times Sunday Magazine, 26 September.

For Saturday, 10/14 (SOC 1103)

October 9, 2017

Before

During

  • How to Make an Argument
  • Film: Sex: Unknown