For Tuesday, 10/10 (SOC 1102)

October 9, 2017

Before

  • Booth, Colomb & Williams, ‘From Problems to Sources’ (Ch. 5 of The Craft of Research)
  • Booth et al., ‘Engaging Sources’ (Ch. 6 of The Craft of Research)

During

  • Recommended Reading: ‘”We Don’t Exist”: Life Inside Mongolia’s Swelling Slums’. This article illustrates the benefits of a comparative/cross-cultural approach to the study of urban life. The plight of these marginalised people, barely surviving on the outskirts of Mongolia’s capital city, connects to current discussion topics like sprawl, and to future topics such as Mike Davis’s research on our ‘planet of slums’; but here there are important regional differences. The expanding slums are not the result of the leapfrogging development practised by speculative developers here in North America, and though life on a landfill (many other slum dwellers have set up traditional yurts, so that’s an example of the local charm and quirk of cross-cultural study) will recall evoke images of barrios, favelas, and shantytowns in places like Caracas, Sao Paolo, and Kingston, Ulan Bator is hardly the kind of megalopolis that typically breeds such urban metastasis (come to think of it, though, Kingston’s population [937,700, according to French Wikipedia] is actually smaller than Ulan Bator’s [1.4 million], so perhaps a comparison of Kingston and Ulan Bator would be in order…). The other things to note about the case of Ulan Bator are, first, that even in this ‘postindustrial’ age we can still readily find the classic phenomenon of rural migration pouring into the city within the space of a few years, and second, that this time climate change is a major driver of such migration, as harsher winters and more-frequent droughts kill off crops and livestock.
  • Review of Research Brief #1
  • Finding and Using Sources
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For Thursday, 10/5 (SOC 1102)

October 3, 2017

Before

During

  • The New Urbanism
  • Pecha Kucha: Jonathan Rodriguez on Barnes (2000)
  • On Defining Basic Terms
  • Are millennials fleeing the cities? This was an idea that we discussed briefly in reference to a recent Op-Ed by Richard Florida, and bears on some claims made by Barnes (2000) about where people want to live these days.

After

  • Booth, Colomb & Williams, ‘From Problems to Sources’ (Ch. 5 of The Craft of Research)
  • Booth et al., ‘Engaging Sources’ (Ch. 6 of The Craft of Research)

 

Further Reading

Cortright, Joe. 2017. ‘Oh, no! Is the urban revival really over?’ CityCommentary, 5 September. I don’t know anything about this blog, but I was struck by the thoughtfulness of Cortright’s commentary on Richard Florida (see above). One comment that he makes about making inferences from relatively coarse-grained puts me in mind of Gans’s admonishments to differentiate more carefully among the component sectors of the city:

Looking to changes in municipal population totals is an unreliable guide to judging the growth or decline of of dense, urban neighborhoods. Many expansive municipalities (Chicago, Phoenix, Jacksonville) take in neighborhoods that would usually be thought of as suburban (i.e. tracts of lower density, single-family auto-oriented development). As is the case in places like Chicago, the densest, close-in urban neighborhoods continue to add population at fast clip, while older more distant neighborhoods continue to shed population.

Harvey, David. 1997. ‘The New Urbanism and the Communitarian Trap’. Harvard Design Magazine 1 (Winter/Spring), pp. 1-3.

For Monday, 10/16 (SOC 3250)

October 2, 2017

Apologies, but I’ve decided to try to follow the plan of our reader, which first asks, How are social movements organised? before going on to consider the question, What do participants do?, which would have gotten us into some interesting discussions of movement tactics vis-à-vis abortion and same-sex marriage (we’ll cover that the week after next).

We had some helpful student presentations last week; who wants to go this week?

Before

  • HW  due: Annotated Bibliography (I’ll add a link to the full instructions shortly, but here is a brief guide to ASA style for your reference list and in-text citations). I’m going to push the due date back until next week, since there are a few administrative things I need to do to make this into something you can submit via Blackboard.
  • John McCarthy and Mayer Zald, ‘Social Movement Organization’ (this is available only in the 3rd Ed. of our reader; I’ll check with library, but they should have this on reserve by now)
  • Alice O’Connor, ‘The Privatized City: The Manhattan Institute, the Urban Crisis, and the Conservative Counterrevolution in New York’, Journal of Urban History (January 2008). You should be able to access this article for free from a campus computer (or from the library’s website), but here’s a PDF version.

During

  • Review: Annotated Bibliography HW
  • Q&A: How are Social Movements Organized?
    • Case Study: The Manhattan Institute
  • Mini-Lecture: Hofstadter and the ‘Paranoid Style’ of American Politics
  • Writing Exercise: Formulating a Research Question (from Booth, Colomb, & Williams 2008:45-8)
    • I am studying ______ (this is what you’re writing about) because I want to find out who/what/when/where/whether/why/how _______ (this is what you don’t know) in order to help my reader understand better _______ (this is why you want your reader to know and care about it).

After

  • TBA

 

REFERENCES

Booth, Wayne, Gregory Colomb, & Joseph M. Williams. 2008. The Craft of Research, 3rd Ed. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

For Saturday, 10/7 (SOC 1103)

September 30, 2017

Before

  • Links to the Moynihan Report, as well as some reading questions to consider, can be found here.

During

  • TBA

For Tuesday, 10/3 (SOC 1102

September 28, 2017

We’ll continue to discuss the question of whether there really are distinct urban and suburban ways of life. The majority of you think there clearly are; why then does Gans disagree? Please review his essay; you might also read ahead (see below). By the way, here’s that essay on gentrification we looked at in class.

Thursday we experimented with having you all access the reading via your smartphones; sadly, I saw too much texting and other interaction with the world outside our classroom. It’s unfortunate, but we’ll have to end that particular experiment.

In-Class Setlist

After

For Monday, 10/2 (SOC 3250)

September 27, 2017

I’m waiting to hear back from the Registrar’s Office about reserving a nice little media room for our upcoming class. I’ll let you know as soon as I hear back from them. We will meet in CA-B86!

Please make sure you get there on time (assuming I give you all the correct room number this time); we’re a small group, so it’s a drag if we have to wait on half the class before we get started. If you’re running late, just text me (my cell phone number is on the syllabus).

Before

  • Eric Hirsch, ‘Generating Commitment Among Students’ (Presenter: Wesley)
  • Nancy Whittier, ‘Sustaining Commitment Among Radical Feminists’ (Presenter: Tee)

During

(We still haven’t discussed Hofstadter’s take on the origins of the mid-twentieth century ‘New Right’, so I will try to squeeze this in.)

After

  • Bert Klandermans, ‘Disengaging from Movements’
  • Kathleen Blee, ‘Reading Racism: Women in the Modern Hate Movement’, in Kathleen Blee, ed., No Middle Ground: Women and Radical Protest (1998)*

For Saturday, 9/30 (SOC 1103)

September 27, 2017

Before

  • Benokraitis (2015), Ch. 3 (‘The Family in Historical Perspective’)

Focus on Section 3.1 (‘The Colonial Family’), the subsection of 3.2 that discusses African-American families, as well as Sections 3.3 (‘Industrialization, Urbanization, and European Immigration: 1820-1930’) and 3.5 (‘The Golden Fifties’).

  • Benokraitis (2015), Ch. 4 (‘Racial and Ethnic Families’)

For Thursday, 9/28 (SOC 1102)

September 27, 2017

Before

*This is a shorter, excerpted version. For a fuller version, including a later postscript, you can go here. Remember to bring hard copies of the reading to class. Electronic copies are fine on tablets, but not on smartphones.

During

  • On Reading Closely
  • The Chicago School, cont’d
  • Urbanism and Suburbanism As Ways of Life

After

  • TBA

For Tuesday, 9/26 (SOC 1102)

September 20, 2017

I forgot to circulate a copy of the syllabus for people to provisionally sign up for the Pecha Kuchas, but there’s nothing stopping you from contacting me and telling me which reading you plan to present on! Figure it out now before it’s too late!

Before Class

[1] I am assigning an excerpted version, but you can go here for the original article in its entirety.

During

  • Introduction: The Chicago School

 

 

After

For Monday, 9/25 (SOC 3250)

September 19, 2017

Before Class

Both of the articles for this week can be found in either the 2nd or 3rd editions of the Goodwin & Jasper reader. Here, btw, is a link to the essay on ‘virtue signaling’ I mentioned in class.

  • Douglas McAdam, ‘Recruits to Civil Rights Activism’
  • Charles Kurzman, ‘Who Are the Radical Islamists?’